Category Archives: Microchips

How To Trace Dead End Microchips and Tag Information on Found Pets

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We would like to thank Marilyn Knapp Litt, the Director of Lost Dogs of Texas for the information in this article. After Hurricane Katrina in 2005, Marilyn formed a group of volunteers which successfully reunited animals that had been displaced by the storm with their families. 

 

If you could spend ten minutes researching a disconnected phone number and get a shelter animal back home – would you do it?  Here are quick and easy instructions for shelter staff or volunteers to do free searches and find the lost families of shelter animals.  This small investment in time will get more animals home, free up kennel space, save money and spread good karma!

Scenario 1:  Animal’s contact information from either a tag or a microchip leads to a dead end.

1. First Sources to Check: 411 Info or Yellow Pages

As of 07/2014, these are sources for free phone numbers and reverse look – up. This will only take a few minutes.  Search on a person’s name to find any contact information.  If you do not have the name, search on the address (reverse lookup tab) or phone number to find out the person’s name and then search the name.  A good rule of thumb is if you to click to see additional information, you will have to pay to see the information.

Google:  Search on the name.

2. Second Sources for Names: ZabaSearch

This is a name search only.  If the name search fails, you get a service charging a fee.  Reverse phone is a fee service only.

3. Third Sources for Names: Social Networks, Etc. These are for the persistent searcher!

Pipl:  Can search for name, email, user name and phone.  This is a very interesting resource.  At the bottom of the page, suggested Facebook profiles are pulled up.

Spokeo: Can search for name,  phone, email, username, friends.  If name search fails, you get a service charging a fee.  You can use a username found on Pipl in the Spokeo search.  People often reuse their username.

Facebook:  Facebook is a good resource, but I would not use it until the last, unless you are searching an unusual name.  If the first name search does not work, try adding a city.  You can also search Facebook for a phone number!  This can be very effective. A message goes to the “other” folder unless you are Facebook friends with the person. Send a message, but don’t count on it to go through. Sometimes you have the option to pay $1.00 to Facebook to make sure they receive it – but the person still has to look at the page to see they have a message, so this does not mean your message will be seen. Look to see if there is a place of employment listed on their profile and call their work. Look through their friends list for people with the same last name and try to call their relatives at work or send a message. You can also try to research their relatives for contact information. Never assume you have made contact until you are messaging or talking with the owner!

Veromi:  Use the “People Search”.  this is a name search, but like ZabaSearch, will show possible relatives.  It may show congregations and organizations.

Dex Pages: Photocopy of a physical phone book – not in all areas.

Comprehensive list of people databases:  For those who don’t want to give up!

Tips:

  • The very best resource you can use is Lexis.  It is an expensive data service.  Many law offices have access to make background reports.
  • A reverse phone number or address search will give you the name of a person.
  • A neighbor search on an address gives you the names of people who live nearby and who should be called as they many know where the family has moved.
  • Do not stop with leaving one message.  The person may not be home and might be reading Facebook.  Or someone might not use Facebook, but might answer the phone.  The trick is to leave many messages at different places.
  • If you have to make an extra click to see the info you searched on, a screen will pop up to charge you. This is without exception.  The pay service may or may not give you the information needed.  Sometimes they will give you a refund and sometimes you will end up with monthly charges or even be scammed.  You need to be vigilant if you pay, but of course you might get exactly what you were looking for. This is meant to be a resource to quickly try and break through a dead end.  The many creative ways to find an animal’s lost family are beyond the scope of these instructions.  For additional help finding someone contact Marilyn at marilyn@marilynlitt.com

Military Owners:

If you think the owner is in the military, you can always “guess” at the address.

For years, the primary format for Army email looked like this:  firstname.lastname@us.army.mil

Of course, soldiers with common names would get an address like: firstname.lastname23@us.army.mil but perhaps your email might get redirected to the right person.

Now, the Army has created a new format that looks like this:

firstname.middleinitial.lastname.mil@mail.mil

That’s what a soldier’s email address would look like.  An Army civilian employee or contractor would have an email address like this: firstname.middleinitial.lastname.civ@mail.mil

Both formats are used.  You may guess at an address if you have a soldier’s name.  The other branches have their own format.

If you know the base, you may be able to contact HR.  They will not tell you how to contact someone in the military, but they may pass on a message about a missing dog if you are polite.  You may also find support groups on Facebook for the base that could be helpful.

Scenario 2: You have determined the brand of microchip (via AAHA microchip lookup) but the microchip has not been enrolled to an owner.

When you call the microchip company, always be friendly.  State that you are calling trying to find the family of an animal.  If you are working or volunteering for a rescue or shelter, be sure to state that right away.  You want to know every bit of information they have and ask for that.  Double check all spelling and numbers.

If the microchip was not registered, ask if they can tell who implanted the chip and if not, who bought the chip.  In the U.S., microchips are sold in bulk by number range to the shelter or vet who does the implanting. The microchip company can usually tell which organization received a chip for implant. When a chip is not registered to an individual, the organization may have that information.  Try calling late at night when the staff will not be as busy and may have more time to help and talk.

Click the link below for more information on microchips (including international microchips) and tattoos. Clicking this link will open a pdf file: chip (2)

Follow-up on to LDI’s Blog “To Hold or Not To Hold”

 

Posted on LDI's Post by Page section

Posted on LDI’s Post by Page section

Our follow-up to our blog To Hold or Not To Hold – Is it the law? – That is our question

The topic generated a great discussion on our Facebook page. It inspired one of our fans to write an email to the Department of Agriculture. Copy of her email:

“Hi, I was wondering if you could tell me what the legal responsibility is if one finds a lost dog.  I have heard you have to do our due diligence in finding the owners before keeping it as a pet or finding it a good home.  Specifically, if the dog has a microchip, does the vet or animal control who reads the microchip legally bound to keep the dog while the owners are contacted.  Can the finder of the dog, keep it until the owners are contacted.  I searched through legislation and your website and could not find information on this.  If you can cite any laws or regulations, that would be great.  Any info you can provide would be greatly appreciated.”

The response to her email:

“Lost” or stray dogs should be turned over to Animal Control.  The Illinois Animal Control Act requires them to scan for a microchip and search for any other identification and then notify the owner.  Once the dog is identified, the animal control is then required to allow the owner 7 days to pick up the dog.  Keep in mind that people who lose their pet will check with animal control to see if it has been picked up or turned in.  If you keep the dog, the owner may never be reunited with their pet.

Mark J. Ernst, D.V.M.

State Veterinarian / Bureau Chief

Bureau of Animal Health and Welfare

Illinois Department of Agriculture

The  response to our fan’s email really didn’t answer the question.  We would still like to see the law in writing.

Thank you Guy and the Anti-Cruelty Society for your blog about the importance of ID tags and Microchipping!

Wally

On April 29, 2015, the Anti-cruelty Society posted this blog What’s in a name…if you don’t have proper ID?

While we are thrilled that Anti-Cruelty is promoting microchipping and ID tags as a way to get lost pets home, we would have hoped that this campaign would have been promoted soon after the ordinance was passed. There was a window of four months before the ordinance was implemented that Chicago  animal welfare organizations could have offered free and low cost microchip clinics in low income and under served areas. Also, a public campaign about the change of the stray hold should have been implemented.

It is stated in Anti-Cruelty’s blog that historically the return to owner (RTO) rate is 2% for lost pets without identification or microchips. Although this may be statistically true, in our opinion, reducing the stray hold was a knee jerk reaction that will result in the missed reunions of many family pets. Implementing more proactive procedures to return more lost pets home should have been the first approach. For your review, we have included our recommendations that were presented two years ago to the Chicago Animal Care and Control (CACC) Management team. These recommendations were never introduced.

Putting the Pieces into Place for Your Pet’s Microchip

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Disclaimer-Lost Dogs Illinois believes all dogs should wear a collar with an up to date readable id tag and have a properly registered microchip.

We know microchips work in helping pets get home when all the pieces fall into place.

First, the animal is brought to a vet clinic, rescue/shelter or animal control facility that scans every animal entering the facility using AVMA standards and has a universal scanner with working batteries that reads all chip frequencies and then:

  • Your microchip is registered to you
  • Your information is up to date
  • The chip is registered to the right animal

All too often we hear reports of found dogs that have chips but; they are not registered, not registered to the correct owner or the information is out of date. At events where we offer free scans to dogs many owners do not understand how microchips work and that they need to register the chip and always keep the information up to date.

So to help get the pieces into place we strongly urge you to make sure your pet’s microchip is registered to you and the proper animal and your information is always kept up to date.

Our Microchip Scanning Events

 

1048685_10200176853651760_78798009_oThank you for allowing us to scan your dog for a microchip at one of our events.

Keeping your microchip information up to date increases the chance that you will be successfully reunited with your dog if he is lost and ends up in a shelter or vet clinic that scans him.  Many times, lost dogs are either adopted out or euthanized when the microchip information is not kept current.  Shelters and vets are busy and don’t have the time to spend tracking down dead-end microchip information. Don’t let that happen to you!

We have given you the 1-800 number of the microchip company that corresponds to the brand of microchip we have detected in your dog.  Call this number if:

  1. You are unsure if your dog’s information is up to date.  Your dog should be registered to YOU with your current phone number and address.  A shelter or rescue may be the secondary contact but you should be the main contact. You want to be the first person they call when your dog is found.
  2. You dog goes missing.  The microchip company will “red flag” your dog and note that he is missing.  They may also put out alerts on your behalf (but there may be an additional fee for this service).

In addition, ask your veterinarian to check your dog’s microchip every year during your annual checkup. Microchips can move, or can occasionally be deactivated when a yearly vaccination needle hits the microchip.

Remember a microchip is only as good as the information connected with it.