Author Archives: Lost Dogs Illinois

Placing Paws Rescue commitment to bring Ebony home!

 

Ebony is a rescue dog with Placing Paws Rescue, where I am a volunteer. She was adopted out and escaped from her new owners house less than a week after being adopted. I live close by, and as soon as she went missing me and other Placing Paws volunteers were out. We put up flyers like crazy, fielded sightings, walked for miles talking to people, feeding stations were set up with cameras.

Eventually a pattern emerged and we were able to figure out what to do and where. Placing Paws spared no expense in finding her, and I was NEVER going to give up on her until she was found. It was exhausting, hard work, but to me, and Placing Paws, worth every second. When she was caught ( in a live trap) she was loaded up and went straight to the vet to be checked out. She has a nasty gash in her shoulder which had already started healing and a fever, but she will be fine ūüôā

We are lucky because we are a pretty tight, dedicated rescue group who truly love our animals. A true team effort. ¬† Thank you for all you do to help get these fur babies home !!! ūüôā

Thank you, Julie C, for sharing Ebony’s story.

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Apology from Lost Dogs Illinois Director – Chicago Animal Care and Control Return to Owner Statistics

I had been under the understanding that Chicago Animal Care and Control Return to Owner actually meant “stray” return to owner. ¬†Little did not I know it included other categories which CACC ¬†considered return to owner.

This is my statement to the Commission members of Chicago Animal Care and Control on July 19th.

My name is Susan Taney, Director of Lost Dogs Illinois.  Lost Dogs Illinois is a not for profit organization that helps citizens find their lost dogs and Good Samaritans find lost dog’s owners but we also work with Animal Controls to increase their Return to Owner rate and decrease their stray intake.. We have typically defined Return to Owner as the percentage of stray or lost dogs who are brought in to CACC which are reunited with their owners.

I would first like to address the return to owner statistics. I‚Äôll refer to it as RTO from here on in. ¬†This year on CACC‚Äôs website I noticed that in the month of March the RTO statistics were split into categories: ¬†strays that were reunited with their owner and other dogs that were returned to their owner for other reasons. ¬†(to give you examples: dogs surrendered and the owner changed their mind or evictions or owner went to hospital so these were ‚Äúreturn to owner‚ÄĚ ). In all the discussions we had with CACC we assumed we were on the save wavelength and only referring to the strays that were reunited with their owners. ¬†Also, I noticed that there was a whole new description about the live release rate and other definitions in regards to statistics. ¬†With that in mind, the RTO statistics that I have reported to both CACC and the public have been wrong and are not as positive as I thought they were. ¬†Never was there any indication with discussions with any of the ¬†directors and staff that RTO included not only strays but the other categories I mentioned earlier, as well.

So I am going to now tell you the actual number of stray dogs reunited with their owners for three months in 2017 compared with what I wrote about on our website and Facebook page in which I gave praise to CACC for their stellar improvement.

June, 2017              45%               actual            33%

July, 2017                42%              actual            31%

August 2017          53%               actual            33%

I am very disappointed and disheartened about this discovery in regards  to the statistics.

Stray intake has been consistently been at 60%. Progressive animal controls are taking a hard look at stray intake on how to decrease it.  At the last commission meeting I attended, I made suggestions.

I don’t know who the new Director will be but I am truly hoping the new Director will try to fix the broken animal control system in Chicago with being a leader in the field which will expand to Cook County.Obviously the Live Release Rate has increased but the actual animal control system needs to be addressed, supported by the mayor and public and brought into the 21stcentury.

Thank you for your time.

Below listed are the actual statistic posted on the CACC’s website.

Below are the actual statistics that I FOIA’d. ¬†What is FOIA?¬†The¬†Freedom of Information Act¬†(FOIA) is a United States federal law that grants the public access to information possessed by government agencies. Upon written request, U.S. government agencies are required to release information unless it falls under one of nine exemptions listed in the Act. ¬†As a citizen you have the right to request information possessed by government agencies.

 

 

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Ten Things You Need to Know Before Hiring a Tracking Dog Service

1375911626rvuyxWe often get asked about tracking dog services for missing dogs.  Some of these services are good, some are not so good and some are out and out scams. They will cost many hundreds and possibly thousands of dollars depending on where they are located and the distance they have to travel. Most will also charge an initial phone consultation fee.  Some services will require that you purchase extra products like flyers and signs. Before you hire a tracking dog service to help find your missing dog, please do your homework.  Here are some key points to consider:

  1. Tracking dogs will not capture your dog. They may or may not be able to indicate whether your dog was in an area and the direction of travel. But you will still have to do the work of flyering the area, monitoring sightings,  establishing a feeding routine and trapping your dog.  Tracking dogs are not a magic pill.  If a service guarantees success, they are a scam.
  2. A tracking dog is kept on a long line and can only travel as fast as the handler travels. (consider the fitness level of the human on the other end of the leash). Rough terrain and extreme temperatures will be factors.  Most lost dogs will be able to easily outpace a tracking dog and handler.  Ask the tracking service if you can accompany them on the search with the handler and the dog. Be suspicious if they say no.
  3. Tracking dogs may be a poor choice for scared, lost dogs that are in survival mode. These dogs need to settle into an area and establish a feeding routine.  Tracking dogs may  pressure them out of the area that they may have settled in. You will then have to start all over in a new area with flyering and signs to generate sightings.
  4. ¬†Be very skeptical of services that tell you they will have to keep coming back to ‚Äúconfirm‚ÄĚ a scent. Each of these visits may cost you more money and you risk your dog being pressured again out of an area that he may have settled in. You will then have to start over using flyers and signs to generate new sightings.
  5. ¬†There is no accredited school for training scent dogs for finding lost dogs.¬†¬†Trackers often claim success when it was actually flyers or another method of generating sightings that brought the dog home.¬†Check references and successes thoroughly. Personally check with at least five or six references via telephone. Do not rely on online ‚Äúreviews‚ÄĚ ¬†or recommendations.
  6. Reputable tracking dog services will have a contract for you to review and sign and will take credit cards. Make sure you have a clear idea up front of what the total cost will be.  Never send cash or wire transfer money. 
  7. Tracking dogs have much greater success at finding lost cats (who hide when scared) than lost dogs (who run when being pressured).  Ask the tracking dog service what their success rate is.  If they guarantee they will find your dog, or quote an overly optimistic success rate, they are probably a scam.
  8.  Tracking success depends on many things: the weather, the length of time the dog was in the area, the terrain and environment.  The service should give you an honest assessment of what you are dealing with. The longer your dog has been missing the less likely the tracking dog will be able to pick up a scent
  9. Search and rescue dogs are certified for human recovery only and will not normally be  used for tracking missing pets. If someone tells you they will bring their search and rescue dog to look for your missing dog, be extremely skeptical. Ask to see their training records and their certification.
  10. Some tracking dog services, lost pet services and pet detectives prey on the distraught owner by making unsolicited contact with them from their missing dog flyers. ¬†Be VERY careful. Many of these are scams, or at the very least ‚Äď very expensive services that do what you can do yourself for a fraction of the cost.

Remember, if it sounds too good to be true, it probably is. Stay calm, do your research and spend your money wisely.   Generating sightings is the key to a successful recovery. Consider how many flyers, signs, newspaper ads or even billboards  could be purchased with the money you would spend on a tracking dog service.  Your lost dog is depending on you to bring him safely home.

Our tips, ideas and articles are based on information gathered from thousands of successful lost dog recoveries. Any advice or suggestions made by Lost Dogs of Wisconsin/Lost Dogs Illinois is not paid-for professional advice and should be taken at owner’s discretion.

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Keep Your Dog Safe during the 4th of July Holiday!

The 4th of July holiday is a time of parties and celebration. Unfortunately, Animal Control facilities nationwide report a spike in dog intake during this holiday. Make sure your dog isn’t one of the holiday statistics by following these tips:

  • Take your dog for a walk or to the dog park before the fireworks start. This allows your dog to exercise, release pent up energy and go ‚Äúpotty‚ÄĚ.
  • Keep dogs indoors. They may even feel safer if they are placed in a smaller interior room. Give your dog an interactive toy like tasty treat filled Kong.
  • Close your windows. Dogs can try and get out of the house by pushing out the screen. Turn the air conditioning or radio on.
  • Make sure your dog has a license and an identification tag on a properly fitted buckled or martingale collar and is microchipped.
  • If your dog is shy and/or fearful, walk the dog with collar and a harness, clipped together or with two separate leashes.
  • During this time of festivities and fireworks, do not let your dogs out alone even in a fenced yard. Keep a leash on your dog – dogs have been known to scale fences to get away from the noise.
  • Most importantly, please do NOT take your dogs to the fireworks celebration!
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It’s Party Time! A Tip Worth Repeating

Graduation parties, Memorial Day picnics,¬†Father’s Day, July 4th…warm weather brings lots of opportunities for friends and family to gather. ¬†If your pet is not one who goes with the flow, be sure to provide them with a nice quiet place away from the crowds to relax and feel secure. ¬†If your dog is a party animal and wants to be in the midst of the party – great!! ….¬† Just be sure that someone keeps an eye on them and no escape routes like doors or gates are accidentally left open.

Keep your dog safe during summer get-togethers

Keep your dog safe during summer get-togethers

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Spring into Action to keep your Dog Safe!

Now that the weather is warming up, it is time to “Think Spring” and make sure you take care of these little things that will keep your dog safe and home where he/she belongs!

  • Check collar & leash for wear & tear ‚Äď replace worn and weak
  • Examine your pets ID/license/rabies tags and ensure they are readable and the information is still current
  • At your pet‚Äôs spring checkup have the microchip scanned to make sure it is working properly
  • If you‚Äôve moved make sure to update contact information with the microchip company. (may be a nominal fee)
  • Check your fence and repair for any winter damage
  • Check your window screens ‚Äď If weak, replace w/pet screening
  • Check screening and latches on screen doors

Prepare a Lost Pet Packet and keep it handy:

Photos and detailed description of your dog.

Nearest animal control facility address and phone number.

Rabies vaccination certificate, license number, microchip number and the company’s contact information.

Be Aware & Be Prepared – Don’t Allow your Dog to become a Lost Dog Statistic!

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