Category Archives: Prevention

Tips to keep your dog safe.

Coalitions Work to Keep Families Together in Illinois

This year already  Lost Dogs Illinois has partnered with several groups to offer free vaccines, microchips, collars and leashes and engraved ID tags. We pride ourselves in helping to preserve the human-animal bond.

April, 2017 – LDI partnered with Garrido Stray Rescue Foundation and Realtors to the Rescue to offer Free microchips and engraved ID tags to over 120 dogs and cats at the 16th Chicago Police District.

May 13, 2017 – LDI partnered with the Chicago Wolves to provide free services to over 535 dogs and cats at the McGuane Park, Chicago.

May 21st LDI along with One Tail at a Time and Alive Rescue offered free services to over 350 dogs and cats in the South Lawndale area.

 

Lost Dogs Illinois also offered 50 free microchips each to Whiteside County Animal Control and Lee County Animal Control for their low cost microchip clinics in May and June.

To round off our spring events, LDI attended Pawberry Lane Open House in April to provide free microchip scans.

LDI provided free microchip scans at the Humane Society of Aurora in May.

 

Thanks to Perfect Pooches rescue Lost Dogs Illinois was able to share a booth with them at the Paws on Route 66 in Joliet.

Please continue to support Lost Dogs Illinois and their mission by making a tax-deductible donation

Click here:  https://lostdogsillinois.org/support-ldi/

Baby, it’s Cold Outside – Keep Your Dog Safe

Baby, it’s Cold Outside – Keep Your Dog Safe

jasper

 

 

 

 

 

With the weather becoming blustery, dog owners might consider the following safety tips:

  1. Keep ID tags on your dog at all times along with a properly fitted collar – personal ID tag, Rabies/license tag, and microchip tag.  If your dog gets lost, you want the person who finds your dog to be able to easily contact or find you.
  2. Make sure your dog is microchipped and the chip is registered to you.  A microchip is a tiny chip implanted between your dog’s shoulder blades; it can be scanned and used to identify your dog.  Don’t forget to update your contact information with the microchip registry if you move.  (If you adopted your dog from an animal shelter, he/she may be already microchipped. Check your adoption records or ask your veterinarian to scan your dog for a microchip.)
  3. Use a sturdy, traditional leash; slip the loop of the leash over your right thumb and close your fingers tightly around the loop.  Use left hand to hold the leash further down.   if she/he tries to bolt, you have both hands on the leash.
  4. When children are walking the dog, they should not only be old enough to understand the safety precautions, but also physically strong enough to handle the dog if he/she attempts to bolt.
  5. If you let your dog out into a fenced yard, check the fence on a routine basis to make sure it is secure.  Winds and snow can damage your fence.
  6. Be extra cautious with shy/timid dogs.  When walking them, make sure they have a properly fitted martingale collar along with a harness; either hook the harness and collar together with one leash or leash separately.  Both collar and harness should have ID tags.

Bundle up and enjoy!

Tips to Keep Your Dog Securely in Your Yard

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The neighbor’s husky pup can’t get past the buried landscape timber. An hour later he made his way into my yard. He found a spot where there was no barrier. 

by Barb McDonald, LDOW Volunteer and Founder of the Lost/found Husky Dogs Facebook page

Here are some ways, many cheap and still very effective ways to keep your dog from getting through the fence and getting lost. Dogs that jump over, climb over, dig under, squeeze through gaps, etc. Some ways can also help keep coyotes and other animals out of the fence as well. Most of these will work for almost any type of fence

DOGS THAT CLIMB THE FENCE– Use Coyote Rollers or Lean Ins. Coyote rollers are mounted at the top along the entire fence and they literally roll so it’s impossible for your dog to get a grip on it to get over the fence. If you’re a handy man you can make these out of PVC pipe for cheaper. Just make sure they ROLL and that you place them high enough to keep your dogs paw from getting stuck but low enough to keep your dogs head/body from getting stuck. These can be installed on pretty much any type of fence and also work great for keeping coyotes and other animals out of your fence and keeping your animals safe.Lean ins are simple and cheap. You can use welded/chicken wire for these. It’s just angled fencing attached to the top. This makes it impossible for a climbing dog to keep a grip to get over the fence. Both of these methods are used at wolf hybrid rescues to keep them from escaping. Both can also be taken down and moved if you ever move to a new place.

DOGS THAT DIG UNDER THE FENCE– Use a “no dig” fencing/L-footer system. For no digging wire/fence you can use welded wire literally dug into the ground and buried at a slant but enough left out to connect it to the fence. If you have to cut the wire for any reason be sure to keep the sharp edges facing where the dog won’t come in contact with them or you can dull the ends of them. You can also use welded wire and lay it directly on the ground along the fencing still connecting it to your fence though like an “L.” To secure it to the ground use lawn staples. You can always use concrete to make a no dig “fence” or footer too. Same concept but with concrete.

DOGS THAT SQUEEZE THROUGH SMALL SPACES– If your dog is squeezing through small spaces such as the spaces in a picket fence you can do a couple things. You can buy a puppy bumper. They connect to the collar so as long as the collar fits correctly the bumper won’t fall off. Do not make your dog wear these 24/7 & make sure there is nothing around your dog can get caught on. Use them when letting the dog out to potty or just to run around and play for bit. They are light weight but your dog may need time to get used to it because it may be a little “uncomfortable” at first but it’s better than having a lost dog. Besides a puppy bumper you can use a Bar Harness, these are just a few dollars more but will work better with wider gaps and probably more comfortable. They make these for large dogs as well.If you don’t want to use a puppy bumper/bar harness you can always line the fence with a mesh wire, they do sell some mesh wire that is hardly even noticeable. If you don’t like the look of wire you can use bamboo rolls to line the fence with.

DOGS THAT DASH THROUGH THE FENCE DOOR WHEN OPENING IT– Simple and quick fix. Make an Airlock Fence Entrance. This is just a small extra fenced area/barrier attached to your fence entrance (inside the fence or outside the fence) so if your dog dashes out it prevents him from running off by keeping him inside the entrance. Making it easier on you to keep your dog in the yard. Also great for people that have kids that don’t always pay attention when opening the gate and causing the dog to get loose. If your fence doesn’t stay latched, buy new latches and/or locks. If you’re worried about your dog dashing through the front door and it’s a small dog a wrap around baby gate as an “airlock entrance” may do the trick for inside the home.

FENCE JUMPERS– Remove anything the dog can use to help them jump over the fence… tables, dog house, etc. Install an extension either to make the fence taller by using welded wire or to put a flat barrier to block them from getting past where they jump.

*If your dog is just squeezing under a chain link fence that has gaps under it or just isn’t secured to the ground… you can buy some lawn anchor/staples for $15-$25 and secure the bottom of the fence to the ground.

*If your fence has a hole patch it up or if it’s possible remove that section of the fence and replace it with a new section.

OTHER TOOLS: 

COYOTE ROLLERS- http://www.coyoteroller.com/

LEAN IN’S- http://www.inetdesign.com/wolfdunn/containment/barbarms.html

NO DIG FENCING/L-FOOTER-http://www.humanesociety.org/animals/resources/tips/digging_animals_fence.html

PUPPY BUMPER- http://puppybumpers.net/shop.htm (might be cheaper on Amazon)

BAR HARNESS- http://www.dog-gamutt.com/store/

AIRLOCK- (Can’t seem to find anything online explaining how to make one of these for a fence. If you look at the picture I’m sure you’ll be able to make it just fine.)

LAWN STAPLES- http://www.radiofence.com/pet-fence-staples/?zmam=59663114&zmas=1&zmac=4&zmap=SS-100&gclid=CNHNmLPg4LwCFa9FMgodlyAAJg

http://www.amazon.com/A-M-Leonard-Anchor-staples-Pack/dp/B001FA9SBG

HEIGHT EXTENSION FOR FENCE JUMPERS- http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sYcqVBA0WKA

Lose a dog – Who Me?

 

Ricky

Ricky

I never thought it would happen to me but it did.  Six years ago, I lost two dogs; two months apart, from two different vet clinics, in two different towns.

I’ve been in animal welfare for over 26 years and my husband lovingly calls me an “over the top” dog owner.  Our backyard resembles Fort Knox with gates locked; our dogs know the command wait, there are barricades in front of the doors and a screen door to the garage.  The dogs wear martingale collars with a license, ID tag and microchip tag.  Our shy dogs also wears a sensation harness connected to their martingale collar prompting my husband to note he will grow old before I get all the dogs ready for a walk.  Still though my dogs got lost.

Both of my dogs’ escaped from vet clinics, in both cases it was an accident pure and simple.  Regardless of how they got lost I had a plan ready should this ever happen and I got both dogs back safe and sound!

Ricky, my beagle was lured in by a friendly female beagle after a sighting called in by the first person I handed a flyer to.  Ellie, the Basset, was another story, we fliered heavily, especially at intersections, to get people’s attention while they were stopped.  We received over 50 sightings in 29 days (the whole town of Huntley knew she was missing) and then she was finally captured in a humane trap.Elie

So even though you have not experienced losing a dog, and think it would “never” happen to you, please take a minute – read our articles on our website and have a lost dog packet ready.  Be prepared!!!

Susan Taney

Director/founder of Lost Dogs Illinois

Tis the Season to be Jolly- Tips to Remain Jolly and Keep Your Dogs Safe

Christmas photoStatistics show that many dogs become lost during the holiday season.  With the holidays fast approaching Lost Dog Illinois would like to remind you to keep your dog safe during the hustle and bustle:

Traveling with your pet

  • Be sure your dog is wearing a current ID tag that includes your cell phone number.
  • Carry a copy of your dog’s rabies certificate in case your dog gets lost and is picked up by Animal Control.  It is proof of a current rabies vaccination and your ownership.
  • As an added precaution, simply take a piece of paper and packing  tape, write the address/phone number of where you will be staying and  tape it to the collar as a back-up or attach a temporary ID tag with the same information.

Hosting parties or gatherings

  • Including your 4 legged friend is great, but if your dog is not one who goes with the flow, be sure to provide them with a nice quiet place away from the crowds to relax and feel secure.
  • If your dog is a party animal and wants to be in the midst of the party – great!! ..Just be sure that someone keeps an eye on them or in a separate room and no escape routes like doors or gates are accidentally left open.
  • Remember dogs that were unfazed by Uncle Joe giving them a kiss on top of the head or Grandma pinching their cheeks last year-may be terrified this year. Err on the side of caution.

Happy Holidays!

 

 

Baby, it’s Cold Outside – Keep Your Dog Safe

jasper

 

 

 

 

 

With the weather becoming blustery, dog owners might consider the following safety tips:

  1. Keep ID tags on your dog at all times along with a properly fitted collar – personal ID tag, Rabies/license tag, and microchip tag.  If your dog gets lost, you want the person who finds your dog to be able to easily contact or find you.
  2. Make sure your dog is microchipped and the chip is registered to you.  A microchip is a tiny chip implanted between your dog’s shoulder blades; it can be scanned and used to identify your dog.  Don’t forget to update your contact information with the microchip registry if you move.  (If you adopted your dog from an animal shelter, he/she may be already microchipped. Check your adoption records or ask your veterinarian to scan your dog for a microchip.)
  3. Use a sturdy, traditional leash; slip the loop of the leash over your right thumb and close your fingers tightly around the loop.  Use left hand to hold the leash further down.  This will keep the dog on your left and if she/she tries to bolt, you have both hands on the leash.
  4. When children are walking the dog, they should not only be old enough to understand the safety precautions, but also physically strong enough to handle the dog if he/she attempts to bolt.
  5. If you let your dog out into a fenced yard, check the fence on a routine basis to make sure it is secure.  Winds and snow can damage your fence.
  6. Be extra cautious with shy/timid dogs.  When walking them, make sure they have a properly fitted martingale collar along with a harness; either hook the harness and collar together with one leash or leash separately.  Both collar and harness should have ID tags.

Bundle up and enjoy!

Safe Driving with Dogs

safedriving

 

 

Many dogs are lost from auto accidents.  Sometimes this is unavoidable and if it happens to you, please read our article on how to quickly and safely recover these dogs.

Tips For Dogs That Are Lost From Somewhere Other Than Home

But prevention and good safety are key to keeping a dog safe while you are driving. We would like to share this very educational infographic with you on Safe Driving With Dogs.

fullcoverageautoinsurances.com/safe-driving-with-dogs/

Thank you to Andrew from Teens4Safety.com for suggesting this to us!

Are There More Lost Dogs Now?

Puppy mill dogs and rescued dogs are often shy, undersocialized and wary of strangers. Photo credit: Frank Schemberger

People are always amazed at how many lost dogs there are posted on our Facebook page. We commonly get the question “Are there more lost dogs now? Why?”

Here is our answer:  YES! There are more lost dogs now. As a nation we are saving more dogs than ever, with many more people choosing adoption as their option. This is a great thing but it comes with it’s challenges. For many people this is their first experience owning a shy, rescued dog. These dogs are often high flight risks and can quickly escape through a door or wiggle out of an ill-fitting collar, harness or slip lead.

These high flight risk,  shy puppy mill and rescued dogs have many vulnerable moments while they are making their way through the re-homing system. Dogs are lost from transports, foster homes and  animal shelters or can be lost from their newly-adoptive homes.

There are also more under-socialized pet store dogs than before. Pet store puppies are often taken from their mothers and litter mates far too early, to make it to the pet store market while they are still irresistibly cute and cuddly. But this deprives the puppies of an important socialization period and can result in a shy, fearful personality.

Shy dogs are also being lost from shelters, vet clinics, groomers, pet sitters and kennels in record numbers. Education is the key! Educating people on how to prevent escapes and how to catch a shy, lost dog (don’t chase or call him) will help more of these dogs get home safely. Thank you for spreading the word and helping us!